MEDS Morning Workshops

This free workshop series focuses on best practices in medical education for Medical School faculty/educators who teach our students and residents in a variety of medical settings, including lectures, small groups and in the clinic.

Click on each title below for a description of the session.

January 19 • 10-11am • Mayo B646 or via WebEx

Getting under the hood of PubMed to find literature in Medical Education

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Describe PubMed tools and features that save time
  • Identify search terms and strategies for more effective searching
  • Engage in a conversation about the challenges of searching the medical education literature
James Beattie, MLIS, is a librarian by training with 20 years of experience serving faculty and students in health professions education. He held a faculty appointment at NYU School of Medicine, spent several years with Allina Hospitals and Clinics, and most recently spent 13 years at the University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library as a liaison to schools and colleges in the Academic Health Center. Jim is director of Medical Educator Development and Scholarship (MEDS) and Foundations of Critical Thinking (FCT). He is an effective teacher and presenter, and is committed to helping people be better at what they do and to having fun.
 

February 16 • 11am-12pm  • Mayo B646 or via WebEx

Struggling to improve your residents’ patient-centered communication skills?

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • describe the evidence supporting observations in resident communication training
  • explain the barriers to teaching communication
  • use a communication observation teaching tool

Patient Centered Observation Form

Presenters: Patricia Adam and Heather Thompson Buum
 

March 15 • 10-11am  • Mayo B646 or via WebEx

Don't Treat Them Like Children, Using Adult Learning Theory in Medical Education

This workshop will introduce practical information and insights about adult learning theory, how it relates to our students, and how to apply these concepts in any learning setting.

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Define the method and practice of teaching adults - andragogy
  • Create a learning environment suitable for the adult learner
  • Design a medical school course using the principles of the adult education model
Presenters: Alan Johns, MD, MEd and Jim Beattie, MLIS
 

April 19 • 10-11am  • Mayo B646 or via WebEx

MedEdPORTAL - How to get Published

MedEdPORTAL serves as a site for publication of stand alone teaching/learning modules. The qualities that will lead to getting things published in MedEdPORTAL are: an activity that is complete and can be implemented immediately, without any additional work (all materials, resources, content are included); the activity has been implemented and tested on learners and results can be presented to the reviewers and users. Dr. Konia will discuss the process of publication in MedEdPORTAL.
Presenter: Mojca Remskar Konia, MD, PhD, MACM, Residency Program Director, Vice Chair of Education, Department of Anesthesiology, University of Minnesota
 

May 17 • 10-11am  • Mayo B646

Medical School Curriculum Mapping in Action

This workshop will have something for both those that are tasked to map their course, and for those interested in how the medical school will be completing their curriculum mapping. The time spent will be a hands-on guided process of how to access resources, and how to use the the curriculum mapping tool. Concurrently there will be time to ask questions, get clarification, and collaborate with colleagues. Be sure to bring your laptop or tablet!

After participating in this workshop, learners participating in the curriculum mapping process will be better able to:

  • Self-Critique current course objectives and instill quality improvement
  • Apply information from documentation to the process of mapping curriculum in BlackBag
  • Determine and map up session objectives, to course objectives, to PCRS

After participating in this workshop, learners observing the curriculum mapping process will be better able to:

  • Observe and appreciate the process of curriculum mapping in the medical school
  • Develop ideas based on the what was observed
  • Select pertinent elements as take-aways to use in a course/program

Presenters:

  • Adam Maier, Learning Management Systems Manager, Medical Education Department-University of Minnesota
  • Brad Clarke, Director of Curriculum Operations, University of Minnesota Medical School
 

June 21 • 10-11am  • Mayo B646 or via WebEx

Having Difficult Conversations with your Students


After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Recognize problematic (troubling) student behavior
  • Identify appropriate strategies to address the problem behavior
  • Assess the success of the applied strategy
Presenter: James Sidman, MD, Pediatric Otolaryngologist, Director Research and Academic Strategy, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota; Professor of Otolaryngology and Pediatrics, University of Minnesota Medical School

July 19 • 11-12pm  • Mayo B646 or via WebEx

Tips, Tricks, and Techniques for Small Group Facilitation

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Define facilitation, specifically as it relates to small groups
  • Examine mindfulness as a practice which applies to effective small group facilitation
  • Describe challenges related to small group facilitation, and ways to address them
  • Practice facilitation

Presenters:

Kate Venable, MD, is an Internal Medicine/Pediatrics physician with the University of Minnesota, and also Core Faculty with the Global Health Department. She serves as an Assistant Professor, facilitating ECM and FCT groups for first year medical students, and co-directs the online Global Health/Tropical Medicine Course. She practices as a Pediatric Hospitalist and is developing an outpatient, integrative/holistic Internal Medicine practice at the University of Minnesota.

Betsy Murray, MD, MPH, is Director of Medical Student Education for the Department of Pediatrics. She practices as a Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician, working with patients and families in the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Clinic and at the University of Minnesota Children's Hospital, Fairview Specialty Clinic

Back to top

2015

January 28 • 7:30-9am • Mayo B646 (Twin Cities) / 165 Med (Duluth)

Survey Writing Tips, Tools, and Tricks

This hands-on and interactive workshop will provide tips, tools, and tricks from the field of evaluation to write survey questions that provide accurate, useful, and actionable information. A brief introduction will focus on the survey planning process and aligning the survey purpose with the intended use of the results. The majority of the workshop will be focused on writing survey questions that provide unambiguous responses, that increase the ease of analysis, and that have evidence of reliability and validity. Participants are encouraged to bring surveys or survey items they have used in the past. We will spend time critiquing and revising survey items and participants will receive targeted feedback on survey items created at or brought to the training. Resources for survey planning and writing will be shared with all participants.
MN Evaluation Studies Institute is a multi-disciplinary training institute and evaluation hub at the University of Minnesota. We draw upon expertise from education, psychology, public health, social work, business, and Extension to conduct evaluation training and consultative work. We have hosted an annual Spring Training for 20 years and provide customized training focus on a variety of evaluation and methodological topics.
 

February 26 • 7:30-9am • Mayo B646 (Twin Cities) / 112 Med (Duluth)

SNAPPS + One-Minute Preceptor: A hybrid model for case presentations

The case presentation is fundamental to successful communication of clinical data when teaching in the clinic. It is important that the audience (attending) and presenter (student) share a common method for this. A successful presentation provides the information needed for the attending to understand the important clinical information and the student’s reasoning. A six-step mnemonic called SNAPPS structures a learner-led case presentation that is facilitated by the preceptor following the one-minute preceptor model. In this hybrid technique, the learner’s case presentation to the preceptor includes a concise summary of the facts followed by five steps that require the verbalization of thinking and reasoning. The preceptor can then further facilitate discussion of clinical reasoning following the one-minute preceptor model.

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Describe the usual case presentations students give to preceptors.
  • Appraise current opportunities preceptors have for providing feedback on clinical reasoning and uncertainties.
  • Compare SNAPPS presentations to usual case presentations.
  • Consider opportunities to use SNAPPS to provide feedback.
James Nixon, MD, MHPE Dr. Nixon is a professor in the Department of Medicine, as well as in the Department of Pediatrics. He is Vice Chair for Education and Co-Directs Essentials of Clinical Medicine. He is the recipient of several prestigious education awards, including Outstanding Medical Student Teacher, the Educational Excellence Award and the AHC Academy of Excellence in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
 

March 18 • 7:30-9am • Mayo B646 (Twin Cities) / TBA (Duluth)

Small Groups: Efficient and Effective Teaching Tactics

This workshop is designed for faculty who teach small groups of students in seminar, problem-based learning, and tutorial settings. The aim of the workshop is to consider the facilitation skills required in order to make the most of small group teaching, as well as to explore strategies that can be used to enhance interaction and co-operation amongst group members. In the workshop, attendees will learn the basic principles of small group teaching and how it differs from other forms of teaching. Participants will be able to identify and utilize the strengths of small group teaching for their learners' educational objectives and learn strategies to overcome the challenges of small group education.

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Define the characteristics of a small group and list factors for successful group teaching and learning
  • Describe solutions to common small group challenges
  • Apply techniques to elicit information from students that is taught outside the small group
  • Discuss how to use time efficiently and effectively and in coordination with other small groups
Nersi Nikakhtar, MD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine. His practice is at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center, where he works as a primary care physician and as an inpatient attending on the medicine teaching services. Dr. Nikakhtar also serves as an Associate Clerkship Director and Site Director for the Internal Medicine clerkships at the Minneapolis VA, as well as the Assistant Chief for Resident Education and the Director of the Internal Medicine Resident Clinic. He is a Faculty Advisor to medical students at the University of Minnesota Medical School, and he has served as a small group facilitator in numerous medical and community-based education settings.
Back to top

April 2 • 7:30-9am • Mayo B646

Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Small Group Facilitation

Have you ever wondered if there are ways to more effectively facilitate a small group? Or if you could grow in your abilities to guide and direct discussion within a group? What about the over- or under-talkative student, or awkward group dynamics, or the tangential-talker? These questions and more will be addressed at this workshop in an active and interactive format, implementing practical strategies and best-practices. If you currently facilitate a small group, hope to someday, or simply have interest in acquiring skills that apply to a number of teaching venues, you are welcome in this workshop!

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Define facilitation, specifically as it relates to small groups
  • Examine mindfulness as a practice which applies to effective small group facilitation
  • Describe challenges related to small group facilitation, and ways to address them
  • Practice facilitation

Kate Venable, MD, is an Internal Medicine/Pediatrics physician with the University of Minnesota, and also Core Faculty with the Global Health Department. She serves as an Assistant Professor, facilitating ECM and FCT groups for first year medical students, and co-directs the online Global Health/Tropical Medicine Course. She practices as a Pediatric Hospitalist and is developing an outpatient, integrative/holistic Internal Medicine practice at the University of Minnesota.

Betsy Murray, MD, MPH, is Director of Medical Student Education for the Department of Pediatrics. She practices as a Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician, working with patients and families in the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Clinic and at the University of Minnesota Children's Hospital, Fairview Specialty Clinic.

Kathy Brooks, MD, MBA, MPA, directs the University of Minnesota Medical School Rural Physician Associate Program and the MetroPAP program. She is an Associate Professor in the department of Family Medicine and Community Health. She is a Foundations of Critical Thinking facilitator for first year medical students, teaches in small and large group settings in the RPAP program, and precepts family medicine residents at Broadway Family Medicine Residency Clinic. She regularly teaches at the Harvard Macy Program for Educators and consults nationally with medical schools implementing longitudinal integrated clerkship programs.

 

June 2 • 7:30-9am • Mayo B646 (Twin Cities) / 112 Med (Duluth)

Active Learning in Large Groups

This workshop will give participants the opportunity to learn strategies to employ active teaching methods into large group settings. Participants will be encouraged to think about ways in which they incorporate active and engaging teaching methods that are often used in small groups. Participants will be given the opportunity to consider their own courses and how to employ more active strategies into their teaching that will encourage improved learning and student participation. In addition, participants will be encouraged to think about the expectations of the learners in a more active/interactive large group learning experience.

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Identify tools and skills for active teaching.
  • Discuss ways to appropriately incorporate active teaching strategies into large group settings.
  • Define expectations for learners in an active teaching/learning setting.
Stephen Katz, PhD Dr. Katz is an associate professor, associate director of graduate studies, and director of education in the Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology. According to his department head, “Stephen Katz is one of the most gifted, enthusiastic, hardworking, and beloved educators in the Medical School.” He has received over 30 teaching awards, including the Minnesota Medical Foundation’s Lifetime Distinguished Teaching Award and the prestigious All-University Award for Outstanding Contributions to Postbaccalaureate, Graduate, and Professional Education.
 

July 24 • 7:30-9am • Mayo B646

Tips, Tricks and Techniques for Small Group Facilitation

Have you ever wondered if there are ways to more effectively facilitate a small group? Or if you could grow in your abilities to guide and direct discussion within a group? What about the over- or under-talkative student, or awkward group dynamics, or the tangential-talker? These questions and more will be addressed at this workshop in an active and interactive format, implementing practical strategies and best-practices. If you currently facilitate a small group, hope to someday, or simply have interest in acquiring skills that apply to a number of teaching venues, you are welcome in this workshop!

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Define facilitation, specifically as it relates to small groups
  • Examine mindfulness as a practice which applies to effective small group facilitation
  • Describe challenges related to small group facilitation, and ways to address them
  • Practice facilitation
Kate Venable, MD, is an Internal Medicine/Pediatrics physician with the University of Minnesota, and also Core Faculty with the Global Health Department. She serves as an Assistant Professor, facilitating ECM and FCT groups for first year medical students, and co-directs the online Global Health/Tropical Medicine Course. She practices as a Pediatric Hospitalist and is developing an outpatient, integrative/holistic Internal Medicine practice at the University of Minnesota.

Betsy Murray, MD, MPH, is Director of Medical Student Education for the Department of Pediatrics. She practices as a Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrician, working with patients and families in the Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics Clinic and at the University of Minnesota Children's Hospital, Fairview Specialty Clinic.

Kathy Brooks, MD, MBA, MPA, directs the University of Minnesota Medical School Rural Physician Associate Program and the MetroPAP program. She is an Associate Professor in the department of Family Medicine and Community Health. She is a Foundations of Critical Thinking facilitator for first year medical students, teaches in small and large group settings in the RPAP program, and precepts family medicine residents at Broadway Family Medicine Residency Clinic. She regularly teaches at the Harvard Macy Program for Educators and consults nationally with medical schools implementing longitudinal integrated clerkship programs.
Back to top

September 23 • 10am-12pm • Mayo B646 (Twin Cities)

Constructing Quality Exam Questions

Dr. Paula Termuhlen, Duluth Regional Campus Dean, drawing on her experience on the NBME & ACGME Residency Review Committee, will present a workshop titled, Constructing Quality Exam Questions. This session will provide guidance on best practices for writing, reviewing, and refining test items with a focus on one-best-answer formats. This practical, hands-on workshop will serve as a useful refresher and an opportunity to learn new skills.

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Employ techniques that improve item-writing efficiency, and increase the quality and number of items
  • Write items in teams and provide feedback
  • Promote valuable cross-disciplinary exchange
Paula M. Termuhlen, MD, FACS, is Professor of Surgery and Regional Dean of the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus. Dr. Termuhlen is a Past President of the Association of Program Directors in Surgery and serves on the ACGME Residency Review Committee for Surgery. She has been a member of two Milestones Workgroups, General Surgery and Complex General Surgical Oncology. She is a member of the USMLE Management Committee at the National Board of Medical Examiners and is widely published in surgical oncology and surgical education.
 

September 24 • 7:30-9am • Mayo B646 (Twin Cities)

Small Groups: Efficient and Effective Teaching Tactics

This workshop is designed for faculty who teach small groups of students in seminar, problem-based learning, and tutorial settings. The aim of the workshop is to consider the facilitation skills required in order to make the most of small group teaching, as well as to explore strategies that can be used to enhance interaction and co-operation amongst group members. In the workshop, attendees will learn the basic principles of small group teaching and how it differs from other forms of teaching. Participants will be able to identify and utilize the strengths of small group teaching for their learners' educational objectives and learn strategies to overcome the challenges of small group education.

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Define the characteristics of a small group and list factors for successful group teaching and learning
  • Describe solutions to common small group challenges
  • Apply techniques to elicit information from students that is taught outside the small group
  • Discuss how to use time efficiently and effectively and in coordination with other small groups
Nersi Nikakhtar, MD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine. His practice is at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center, where he works as a primary care physician and as an inpatient attending on the medicine teaching services. Dr. Nikakhtar also serves as an Associate Clerkship Director and Site Director for the Internal Medicine clerkships at the Minneapolis VA, as well as the Assistant Chief for Resident Education and the Director of the Internal Medicine Resident Clinic. He is a Faculty Advisor to medical students at the University of Minnesota Medical School, and he has served as a small group facilitator in numerous medical and community-based education settings.
 

October 9 • 7:30-9am • Mayo B646 (Twin Cities) / TBA (Duluth)

Game Changer: How to Implement Game Based Learning to Change your Educational Experiences

Innovative educational games have been shown to be effective alternatives (and reinforcers) to traditional didactics with participants reporting better attitudes about learning. Well-designed game-based learning sessions use non-threatening competition to capitalize on heightened learner engagement, allowing for dynamic group discussion that is fun, memorable, and effective. This workshop will give participants the tools to create their own games and to maximize their impact as an educational tool for both large and small group settings. As a part of the session, participants will be introduced to a framework of Twelve Tips for Effective Game-Based Learning which they will immediately be able to apply in small groups to create and present a novel educational game. In addition, participants will share examples of games they have seen used before, and obtain group feedback incorporating the 12 Tips on how that game might be improved for future use.

Michael B. Pitt, MD is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota and Co-Director of Global Health Education in the Division of Global Pediatrics. An award-winning educator, Mike has published several curricula in non-traditional education methods ranging from Game-Based Learning, learning through social media, and simulation, and is Co-Creator of the Simulation Use for Global Away Rotations (SUGAR) curriculum, which uses cases designed to mimic resource-limited settings to better prepare clinicians for working abroad, and is being used at dozens of institutions across the country.

Emily Borman-Shoap, MD is the pediatric residency program director at the University of Minnesota. She completed her medical degree at Washington University in St. Louis and her residency training at the University of Minnesota. Her clinical focus is in general pediatrics, with a special interest in caring for children with complex healthcare needs. her academic focus is on medical education, specifically medical student and resident education. She is actively involved in mentorship and advising, as well as educational innovation across the continuum of medical education.

 

November 19 • 7:30-9am • Mayo B646 (Twin Cities)

SNAPPS + One-Minute Preceptor: A hybrid model for case presentations

The case presentation is fundamental to successful communication of clinical data when teaching in the clinic. It is important that the audience (attending) and presenter (student) share a common method for this. A successful presentation provides the information needed for the attending to understand the important clinical information and the student’s reasoning. A six-step mnemonic called SNAPPS structures a learner-led case presentation that is facilitated by the preceptor following the one-minute preceptor model. In this hybrid technique, the learner’s case presentation to the preceptor includes a concise summary of the facts followed by five steps that require the verbalization of thinking and reasoning. The preceptor can then further facilitate discussion of clinical reasoning following the one-minute preceptor model.

After participating in this workshop, learners will be better able to:

  • Describe the usual case presentations students give to preceptors.
  • Appraise current opportunities preceptors have for providing feedback on clinical reasoning and uncertainties.
  • Compare SNAPPS presentations to usual case presentations.
  • Consider opportunities to use SNAPPS to provide feedback.

James Nixon, MD, MHPE, is a professor in the Department of Medicine, as well as in the Department of Pediatrics. He is Vice Chair for Education and Co-Directs Essentials of Clinical Medicine. He is the recipient of several prestigious education awards, including Outstanding Medical Student Teacher, the Educational Excellence Award and the AHC Academy of Excellence in the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

Andrew Olson, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics and is an Academic Hospitalist at the University of Minnesota Medical Center and Masonic Children’s Hospital. He is also the Course Director for the Advanced Physical Diagnosis elective course for medical students and is an instructor in the Ultrasound for Medicine Course. His interests include medical decision making and cognitive errors in medicine, physical examination instruction and research, point-of-care ultrasonography, and systematic reviews of diagnostic testing.

Nersi Nikakhtar, MD, is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Internal Medicine. His practice is at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center, where he works as a primary care physician and as an inpatient attending on the medicine teaching services. Dr. Nikakhtar also serves as Medicine Clerkship Director for the Medical School and is a Faculty Advisor.

 

December 10 • 10-11am • Mayo B646 (Twin Cities) / TBD (Duluth)

There's an App for That: Disruptive Innovation at the Point-of-Care

Upon completion of this activity, participants will be better able to:

  • Discuss the concept of disruptive innovation, particularly as it relates to point-of-care medical apps.
  • Identify apps for potential use in their own clinical practice and teaching.
  • Assess the potential research applications of these tools.
Bradley Benson, MD, is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Pediatrics. He graduate from Vanderbilt University Medical School and completed training in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics here at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Benson is the Director of the Division of General Internal Medicine, a position he has served in since 2009. In addition, in 2011, he took on a leadership role in the Hospital Medicine Program and serves as the Executive Medical Director for the Adult Hospital Medicine Services Line at the University of Minnesota Medical Center. Dr. Benson's interests include Primary Care for adults and children; adolescents and adults with childhood-onset disease; and Milestone based competency assessment across the continuum of medical education.

Back to top

Return to:  Medical Education : Medical School : AHC : U of M

© 2016 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.
The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer.